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Programs:

Immigration In and Out of the Classroom

Read our blog on how to teach immigration and engage students on timely immigration issues.

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Calling All 5th Graders

Join the National Creative Writing Contest to explore America as a nation of immigrants and win prizes!

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Our Mission

The Community Education Center strives to promote a better understanding of immigrants and immigration by providing educational resources

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Engage Your Community

Work with local organizations committed to immigrant rights, integration and social justice in your community

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New Book Reviews

Check out new book reviews on immigrant stories from the Community Education Resource Center.

We welcome book reviews from students! Email teacher@immcouncil.org for more information.

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Community Connections

Recently, I excitingly told my young daughters we were going to wake up early and go berry picking at a “pick your own” farm. My three year old exclaimed “I don’t want to pick berries at a farm I want to pick them at a store.” Although it was funny, it made me realize how disconnected we are as a society to our food sources and the nameless people who make it possible for us to have fresh fruits and vegetables on our tables. 

In a nation that’s been around for over 200 years, a surprising number of Americans still trace their ancestry to the countries where their families immigrated from before they came to the U.S.  Among the many persistent myths of U.S. immigration, is the one of eternal optimism and relentless enthusiasm despite the hard work and formidable distances from home.  Yet few likely consider what their ancestors went through emotionally when leaving behind their birthplace and all things familiar to them to make a home in the United States.  Historian Susan J. Matt discusses this in her book Homesickness: An American History. Matt chronicles how Americans from the early settlers to the present have long missed home – even as, in more recent centuries, they encourage dismissing this feeling of persistent longing.

In The News

Washington D.C. - The American Immigration Council is pleased to announce that the first place winner of the American Immigration Council’s 18th Annual 'Celebrate America' Fifth Grade Creative Writing Contest is Anya Frazer from the Fred A. Olds Elementary School in...
In this tweet chat, English teachers discussed the benefits of telling digital stories on immigration to build community and empathy inside and outside of the classroom while being culturally sensitive to student backgrounds and needs.  Our Crossing Borders with...
The Durham Academy News Feed recently highlighted remarks made by the American Immigration Council's Executive Director Ben Johsnon. Johnson spoke at the Durham Academy Upper School's annual Martin Luther King assembly and noted that lessons can be gleaned on a big-...

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